Where to Position the Trailer Axle?

When positioning a trailer axle or adding an additional axle, the key is to make sure that the axles are located in just the right position so that roughly 10 to 15 percent of the total trailer weight is placed on the tongue. Finding the correct axle location can take some trial and error, so it is best to mock up the locations for all the suspension components until you know everything is in the right spot. When building your trailer, it is best to have the layout of the trailer finalized before placing the axle. This will ensure that the axle is placed in the correct spot to accommodate any permanent weight placed inside the trailer, such as furniture, toolboxes, or shelving. The equations in this article can be used to adjust the trailer's axle location to offer the ideal amount of trailer tongue weight.


Steps to Determine Correct Axle Placement

Axle Placement Infographic Showing Steps and Equations



When Tongue Weight is Less than 10 to 15 Percent of Total Weight


If you find that your trailer's tongue weight is less than 10 to 15 percent of the total trailer weight, then the trailer axle will need to be moved further away from the trailer tongue, closer to the back of the trailer. To know how far back the axle needs to be moved, we want to subtract the trailer's tongue weight from 10 percent of the total weight. Then we will divide this number by the total weight. Then we will multiply this by the distance from the tongue to the axle.


For example, let's say we're building a trailer that has a total weight of 3,500 pounds. When weighed at the wheels and coupler, we find that the weight under the wheels is 3,400 pounds and the tongue weight at the coupler is only 100 pounds. With these weights, the trailer's tongue weight is only 2.9 percent of the total weight. The distance from the front of the trailer coupler to the axle center is 96 inches. Check out the equation below to see how much further back the axle needs to be moved.


Example 1
Example Equations when TW is Less than 10 Percent
For Boat Trailers
When building a boat trailer, the axle is often set back further than on a traditional trailer. On a traditional trailer, the heaviest items are loaded at the front, but with a boat the majority of the weight is at the back of the trailer, meaning the axle needs to be further away from the tongue for the trailer to have the appropriate tongue weight.




When Tongue Weight is Greater than 10 to 15 Percent of Total Weight


If you find that your trailer's tongue weight is greater than 10 to 15 percent of the total trailer weight, then the trailer axle will need to be moved closer to the trailer tongue and the front of the trailer.


Knowing how far forward to move the trailer axle takes an equation very similar the the one mentioned above. However, this time, we will subtract the 10 percent of the total weight from the actual tongue weight. Next, divide by the total trailer weight. Finally, multiply by the distance from the coupler to the trailer axle.


To give an example of this equation, let's say we have another trailer being built that has a total weight of 3,500 pounds. This trailer weighs 2,750 pounds under the wheels and 750 pounds at the end of the tongue. This trailer has a tongue weight that is 21.4 percent of the total trailer weight. The distance from the very front of the trailer, the coupler, to the center of the trailer axle measures 96 inches. Check out the equation below to see how far forward the trailer axle need to be moved.


Example 2
Example Equations when TW is Greater than 10 Percent





Related Articles:

Double-Eye Trailer Suspension System Review
Slipper Spring Trailer Suspension System Review
Trailer Maintenance Schedule

Written by: Victoria B

Updated on: 12/19/2017





Questions and Comments about this Article

Bill B.

How do you determine the weight of a trailer with out taking it to a scale? I purchased a home made trailer that has been damaged and needs new axels. The current axel is only 8 inches past the center line. 84607

Reply from Chris R.

Taking the trailer up to a local scale is really the only accurate way to get the trailer's overall weight. Are you needing to determine this before replacing the axles? 67771

Bob W.

Confused. Build tandem 16' utility trailer. Need position for center equalizer. Total wt 1500#, wheel wt 1200#. Tongue wt 300#. Distance tongue to old hanger 165 inches. I got ,move forward 16.5" so 149" to tip of tongue. Currently it's just a frame to weigh no decking. 77901

Reply from Chris R.

Jameson does a really nice job of explaining how to determine the right center hanger location on the answer page I linked below. It's really just a matter of making sure you have 60 percent of the trailer's frame length in front of the hanger. 63421

Lance S.

Just a little confused. if front of trailer to ball is 40 inches and bed length is 100 inches and axile is 3500 pound capacity. where is axile from ball? 75898

Reply from Chris R.

The ideal axle position will depend on the weights you came up with when weighing the trailer - both at the coupler and under the wheels. Once you get those initial weights, you can start to fine tune the axle placement (move forward if tongue weight is too high or rearward if it's too light). There's not a way for me to determine axle distance from hitch ball without those weights. 62014



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